All too often, hopeful entrepreneurs jump into the world of business, hoping to make it big. Drawn in by the idea of working in a field they’re passionate about, calling the shots, and accumulating wealth, they invest time, energy, and money into a business that fails in just a few short years (or less). Though becoming an entrepreneur comes with risks, you can avoid many pitfalls by learning from others’ mistakes. 

Ignoring Personal Finances

The main objective of starting a business is to generate profits. Be that as it may, it can take months or even years before you’re making enough sales to earn a decent salary. As such, you’ll have to rely on your personal finances to tide you over until you reach your earnings goals. Your personal finances will also be instrumental in helping you to acquire capital from lenders and investors. 

Novice entrepreneurs ignore their personal finances and either run out of money or face an uphill battle to get a loan. Preventing this from happening involves several financial management practices. You need to get your debt under control and improve your credit history. From negotiating with creditors and settling accounts to removing inaccuracies from your credit report and utilizing debt consolidation services like those found on MemphisAssociates.com, there are several resources to help you improve your financial status. 

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Quitting Their Jobs

You may be dreaming of the day you can march into the office and tell your boss that you quit. If you’re not prepared financially, however, this move could prove detrimental. Novice entrepreneurs leave their full-time jobs behind to make room for their new business without knowing how they’ll cover their expenses. The pressure to turn a profit becomes so overwhelming that it can have physical and emotional consequences. 

Before quitting your job, do thorough research to determine how much it costs to run your business type and cover your household expenses. Once you have this data, you should try to save at least six months’ to a year’s worth of costs to provide protection. This way, if it takes a while for your business to start making sales, you’re not strapped for cash. 

Taking On All Responsibilities

There are many tasks involved in running a successful business, from accounting and marketing to production and customer service. Novice entrepreneurs make the mistake of trying to take on all these responsibilities themselves. Though it may seem like a feasible way to lower overhead costs, it ends up costing them more. 

As each business task requires in-depth knowledge, skills, and experience, tackling things you’re not well-versed in leads to poor results. Not to mention, spreading yourself too thin can lead to emotional overwhelm and a poor work-life balance. Though it does cost to hire employees or outsource essential services, it’s the most effective way to streamline processes, improve customer service, manage assets vs debts, balance your personal and professional life, and grow your business

Using Free or Cheap Tech

No matter what type of business you own, having reliable technology is imperative to your success. Though purchasing hardware and software for your business can be costly, it’s necessary if you’re going to remain in the competition. 

Novice entrepreneurs looking to save money, however, opt for free and cheap tech solutions with limited features and capabilities that leave them behind in the race. It is best to invest in technologies using equipment, personal and business loans to ensure the most efficient products and services for your target customers. 

The life of an entrepreneur is hard enough. So, why make the journey more challenging by making mistakes that you could easily avoid? If you’re going to invest everything you have into building a brand that aligns with your passions while providing for your family, make sure you’re doing so wisely. If you don’t want to find yourself among the millions of people who started a business that failed in the first five years, take the advice above to avoid making a mistake that could cost you big. 

Posted by Wendy Dessler

Wendy is a super connector who helps businesses find their audience online through outreach, partnerships and networking. She frequently writes about the latest advancements in digital marketing and focuses her efforts on developing customized marketing plans depending on the industry and competition.

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